Fraud advice company boss refuses to answer questions after returning from Fiji

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A consulting firm boss wanted for drunk driving in the US had nothing to say when he landed in New Zealand from Fiji.

Tim Boyd was boss of taxpayer-owned Christchurch City Holdings Ltd (CCHL) but quit earlier this month.

It has since emerged that he had already faced a number of civil lawsuits for fraud and unpaid bills in the United States, had been ordered to pay $30 million in damages, had been charged with driving under the influence drunk in 2011, 2014 and 2018 and had been the subject of a restraining order by an ex-fiancée.

Boyd has yet to comment on any of the revelations – and remained silent when confronted with Things reporters at Christchurch airport on Tuesday afternoon, repeatedly repeating: “No comment”.

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Boyd returned to Christchurch on a flight from Fiji. He walked out of the international arrivals area alone and refused to answer questions about the money he owes and the charges he faces.

He also had no message for the taxpayers of Christchurch – who own CCHL, the company of which he was chief executive.

Tim Boyd refused to answer questions after arriving at Christchurch Airport on Tuesday from Fiji, instead heading straight for a taxi.

ALDEN WILLIAMS / Stuff

Tim Boyd refused to answer questions after arriving at Christchurch Airport on Tuesday from Fiji, instead heading straight for a taxi.

He quickly got into a taxi and left.

There is an active warrant for Boyd’s arrest in Arizona, on charges from 2018 involving alleged drunk driving.

He was also accused of failing to control his speed to avoid a collision, to give information and to obey [police]and also allegedly drove while suspended.

Boyd or his companies have been sued nine times in the United States, according to court records.

The lawsuits, eight of which were decided against Boyd, contained allegations of fraud and unpaid money.

Boyd has been wanted in the US state of Arizona for drunk driving since 2018. He has also been sued multiple times for alleged fraud and unpaid bills.

ALDEN WILLIAMS / Stuff

Boyd has been wanted in the US state of Arizona for drunk driving since 2018. He has also been sued multiple times for alleged fraud and unpaid bills.

Judgments from the trials ordered Boyd to pay NZ$30 million in damages, the majority of which remains unpaid, according to the plaintiffs.

One of the lawsuits against Boyd, involving a $390,000 debt, took place in a Los Angeles court while Boyd was working as a senior adviser in the strategy and analysis team at the Department of Social Development. He worked there from April 2019 to September 2021.

Boyd then joined CCHL as General Manager in March of this year. He resigned earlier this month – although his resignation won’t be official until December 6.

An interim director general, Paul Silk, has already been parachuted in to lead CCHL.

An external review of Boyd’s employment history and any legal issues in the United States, Australia and New Zealand is underway.

CCHL said last week it could take time as it had pledged to “act in good faith as a good employer to Mr. Boyd”.

Boyd's resignation from CCHL is not effective until December 6, although an interim CEO has been named.

ALDEN WILLIAMS / Stuff

Boyd’s resignation from CCHL is not effective until December 6, although an interim CEO has been named.

CCHL also verified all contracts and financial transactions that took place during Boyd’s tenure. Christchurch City Council is about to review this process.

It remains unclear what CCHL was paying Boyd – and whether he is still being paid – although some salary details will be released later this week in the company’s annual report. The general manager role has traditionally paid over $350,000.

Boyd isn’t the only recent CCHL departure.

Chairman Jeremy Smith and director James Gough quit the board within hours of each other in late August.

The company said Smith quit because travel requirements meant he couldn’t fulfill the job’s commitments.

Asked about his resignation on Tuesday, Gough said: “I’m a believer in corporate governance best practice, and if you can’t own the collective decisions of the board, then I don’t think it’s helpful. to stay.

“The CEO employment issue was a contributing factor, but not the only one.”

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